Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Rionna Morgan with Jean Henry Mead

Jean Henry Mead is the author of 18 books, including the Logan & Cafferty mystery/suspense series, Hamilton Kids’ mysteries, historical fiction and nonfiction. She’s also a national award-winning photojournalist who served as a news, magazine and small press editor.

Where are you from?

I was born in Hollywood, a block and a half from Paramount Studios. My brothers and I would sit on the front porch and watch movie stars drive by to the studio’s front gate. We’d wave and were sometimes rewarded with a wave from someone in the cars or limos. When I wasn’t star gazing, I was attending Vine Street Elementary School, which is now covered in graffiti.

Tell us your latest news.
I’m currently vacationing in paradise: a recreational vehicle resort in Southern California with green rolling hills , ponds, waterfalls, ducks, palm trees and a golf course which meanders through the 592-site area (although I don’t play golf.) While sitting with my husband on the patio of the small restaurant last evening, watching ducks diving in the pond, the first chapter of my next Logan & Cafferty mystery/suspense novel came to me, which tentatively begins: It was a lovely evening until a body floated by.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
In my recent mystery, Gray Wolf Mountain, I try to impart the message that killing off keystone predators—wolves and grizzlies—unbalances nature by allowing big game animals to over-populate and consume the vegetation that small animals and birds depend on to survive. I also included a little romance and humor to soften the theme.

If someone wrote a book about your life, what would they title it?
Probably Lost and Found: the Checkered Career of Jean Henry Mead.

What is the ultimate dream vacation?
It doesn’t get much better than my current location. We’ve done a lot of traveling and lived in nine states, including Wyoming, so returning to southern California for me is like a salmon swimming back upstream.

What person in history would you most like to meet?
Agatha Christie, among others. By rereading her books, I learned the language of fiction, along with Dean Koontz and Sue Grafton.

If you could design a refrigerator magnet, what would it say?
Don’t listen to anyone who says you can’t do it!

14 comments:

  1. Hi, Jean, interesting that you are in the Los Angeles area again. I went back to my old neighborhood a few years back and was pleasantly surprised to see it looked good. My old house was no longer there thanks to the Glendale Freeway. Both my grammar school and high school were totally rebuilt to be up to earthquake building codes. I don't like driving in the L.A. area at all--so we avoid it as much as possible.

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  2. Thank you, Rionna, for hosting me today on this lovely site.

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    1. Jean,

      I am so very happy to have you here today. I love your refrigerator magnet!! "Don’t listen to anyone who says you can’t do it!" I totally agree!!

      I hope you have a wonderful day!

      All the Best,
      Rionna

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  3. I appreciate the kind words, Joyce. Thanks also to Marilyn, fellow southern Californian. My second grammar school was torn down and my high school replaced. I'm hoping to see my old neighborhood in eastern Los Angeles before we return to Wyoming.

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  4. Gray Wolf Mountain is sitting here begging to be read, but I've got to wait until I can sit and read it straight through. Great interview, ladies!
    Marja McGraw

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    1. Marja,

      Thank you! I really had fun spending time with such a great lady!

      Smiles from Montana!
      Rionna

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  5. Thank you, Marja. I hope you enjoy the book.

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  6. Jean, I loved your post, from "Paradise" to "The checkered career of Jean Henry Mead" to Agatha Christie (who was my first guide into the world fiction--love her) to your so on the mark advice, "Don't listen to anyone who says you can't do it!" Great post...

    Madeline


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  7. Thank you, Madeline. We're fortunate to have such great role models to guide us in our early years of writing.

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  8. Great title. Know this will be another winner. Thanks for posting more information about your early days.

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  9. Thanks for the kind words, Jake. I hope you're enjoying the series.

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  10. Thanks, Collin. I enjoyed yours as well.

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Thank you for chanting with us today!